Scientific Basis for an Accommodation Already in Use in VT Practices

books

Image courtesy of adamr/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Amanda Zeller Manley, O.D., F.C.O.V.D.

It’s always nice when research proves the benefit of what we’ve already been doing in clinic.

For the last several years, as e-readers have become more prevalent, I have been recommending them to many of my patients. In our clinic, we have found that by increasing the font size (which also increases letter/word spacing and decreases the number of words per line), many of our vision therapy patients report that they can read more quickly, with better comprehension and less fatigue.

So I was quite pleased to hear an NPR story a few days ago about a study described in the journal PLOS ONE.  Researchers had dyslexic students read on specially formatted iPods or printed text. For many of the students, reading on the iPods (limited to about 3 words per line) greatly improved their reading speed and fluency.

The lead researcher, Matthew Schneps, director of the Laboratory for Visual Learning at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, postulates that the mechanisms involved include visual attention span; saccades (the small word-to-word eye movements we make when reading); and visual crowding. By limiting the amount of text per line, deficiencies in those areas don’t have the same effect as when a person reads a normally printed page.

What I find interesting is that in the article, there was no mention of whether these students had had a comprehensive vision examination to look for oculomotor dysfunction, convergence problems (excess or insufficiency), or other binocular vision disorders. In numerous other publications, there have been links between dyslexia and eye movement disorders and binocular vision problems. In many studies of learning disabilities and vision disorders, it has been found that up to 70% of students who have been diagnosed with a learning disability have a vision problem that may be causing or exacerbating that learning difficulty. It would be interesting to see whether the population described in Dr. Schneps’s study has a similar incidence of vision problems.

Fortunately, vision therapy has shown to be a very effective tool in eliminating the underlying visual problems that interfere with reading and learning. And in the meantime, an iPod fits neatly in your pocket.

Top 5 Signs of Back to School Vision Problems

The September issue of Vision & Learning News has news you can use, just in time for back to school. Are your kids having vision issues that keep them from learning as well as they should? Are they working too hard to get their homework done?

The 5 most common signs that a vision problem may be interfering with your student’s ability to read and learn are:

  • Skips lines, rereads lines
  • Poor reading comprehension
  • Homework takes longer than it should
  • Reverses letters like “b” into “d” when reading
  • Short attention span with reading & schoolwork

Just one of these symptoms could mean that your child is struggling with a vision problem.Call today to schedule a developmental vision evaluation: (301) 951-0320

Visit our website for a complete symptom checklist.

Find our previous newsletters on our website.

 

Meet the Authors

Please join us for a very special evening. Dr. Harry Wachs and Dr. Serena Wieder will discuss their new book, Visual/Spatial Portals to Thinking, Feeling and Movement: Advancing Competencies and Emotional Development in Children with Learning and Autism Spectrum Disorders

This long-awaited text provides therapists and parents interventions for use at home, school, and therapy offices. Involving affect-based Floortime approaches and other problem-solving experiences, these strategies address unrecognized challenges that often derail life competencies, learning, and development. More about the book and authors here.

Please join us for this informal gathering where you can chat with the authors and have them autograph your copy of the book while you enjoy some wine and cheese. Limited quantities of Visual/Spatial Portals will be available for purchase.

Thursday, February 28, 2013, 7pm

The event will be held at our office:

The Vision & Conceptual

Development Center

6900 Wisconsin Avenue, Ste 600

Chevy Chase, MD 20815

(301) 951-0320

We will be serving wine and cheese, so please RSVP to help us plan.

R.S.V.P. to Canden Webb, Patient Care Coordinator Canden@VisionTherapyDC.com or 301-951-0320 to receive entry instructions.

Our Winter Mini-Symposium was a Success!

Last night, February 24, 2011, we hosted a mini-symposium at the new and improved Vision & Conceptual Development Center. We had fifteen people in attendance representing a variety of professional backgrounds.
Our first speaker was Joseph Manley, MD, discussing the American Academy of Pediatrics position statement on Learning Disabilities, Dyslexia and Vision. Dr. Manley’s premise is that the AAP is ignoring peer-reviewed research and evidence-based medicine in their assertion that vision therapy is not an appropriate treatment for children with learning disabilities and dyslexia. Dr. Manley presented numerous sources who found a higher incidence of vision problems in children with dyslexia and learning disabilities.

I was the second speaker, with a talk titled Vision, Behavior, and Academics, in which I explored the documented binocular vision problems in students with inappropriate classroom behavior, and how that impacts the learning of all students.

Finally, our keynote speaker was Jean Thomas, MD. Dr. Thomas is the President of Child & Family Integrated Therapies, LLC, which is a part of Integrated Therapeutic Services for Families and Children, Inc, in Kensington, MD. Formerly on staff at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC, Dr. Thomas is recognized nationally and internationally for her contributions to an interdisciplinary effort to develop age-specific mental health diagnostic criteria for children aged birth through three years old. In her talk last night on Early Disruptive Disorders, Dr. Thomas emphasized the importance of the family interactions and dynamics to develop the best outcome for the troubled child.

All in all, the evening was a success, and we look forward to many future educational events for professionals, parents, and patients. To sign up for our mailing list, please click here.

Are you mad as hell?

There is a lot of opinion on the internet, some good, some bad, and a lot that is completely confounding. I recently came across a post on mothering.com in which the original poster describes her daughter’s success in vision therapy and the significant positive changes that have occurred in her life as a result. Great! We have patients in our office every day who tell of the improvements they see in school, work, hobbies, and many other areas of daily life. I always love hearing more.

But in this case, another mom replied that VT has only been proven effective for strabismus and convergence insufficiency.

Where does this idea come from? There is an abundance of data showing otherwise, that in fact vision therapy is an effective treatment modality for numerous other visual dysfunctions. For an incomplete yet impressive listing, see the COVD website. It is frustrating to me and the rest of the community of developmental optometrists, educators, and others who care for children that the science gets swept aside and replaced with opinion. The opinions are repeated again and again until they seem to be true.

Just last week a mother brought her son in to see me. He had numerous symptoms consistent with a binocular vision problem. Sure enough, testing showed he had convergence insufficiency. The mother was relieved to find out the reason for her son’s symptoms, but worried that her mother and others in the family would ridicule her for seeking treatment in the form of vision therapy. So opinion not based in fact may stand in the way of this boy’s academic, sports, and life success.

Dr. Len Press posted this morning about a patient with double vision from convergence insufficiency whose ophthalmologist told her that vision therapy was bogus. Yet the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial was published in the Archives of Ophthalmology. Not the archives of Optometry. Biases (opinions) get in the way, even when it’s published in ophthalmology’s own literature. And these biases prevent children from getting the care they need, and result in children suffering needlessly. Which is something that should make us all mad as hell.