Vision and Learning

C.O.V.D. presents August is Vision & Learning Month

aug17-banner

Each year, the College of Optometrists in Vision Development promotes August as Vision and Learning Month. What’s this all about?

With school starting soon, it’s an excellent time for an eye exam. After all, up to 80% of learning comes through the visual system. The problem parents and their kids run into is that many kids have “20/20” visual acuity (meaning they can read the smallest letters on the eye chart) yet still have vision problems that can get in the way at school.

What type of eye doctor evaluates the 17 visual skills necessary for school success? A Developmental Optometrist specializes in testing and treating all of the visual skills necessary in the classroom. Seeing clearly and having healthy eyes (which is tested by your primary care optometrist or ophthalmologist) are important, but just a starting point.

Classroom tasks and required visual skills downloadable chart

  • Eye teaming problems can cause a person to skip words or lines when reading, or miss small details such as word endings, math signs, etc.
  • Trouble aligning the two eyes when looking at close objects can result in tired eyes, falling asleep reading, reduced reading comprehension, headaches, or just slow reading.
  • The two eyes not teaming well can make depth perception difficult, which can show up as trouble catching or hitting a ball. Poor depth perception can also make driving difficult (moms and dads!), especially making that tricky left turn across traffic lanes.
  • Kids with eye coordination problems can often look like they have ADHD– there’s a big overlap in symptoms. If your eyes hurt when you try to read or do written work, it’s common to be looking out the window instead!
  • Kids with visual processing (visual perception, visual motor integration) difficulties might struggle with reading comprehension; understanding graphs and charts; understanding math concepts– both arithmetic and geometry; or following instructions.
  • See a longer list of vision symptoms that can interfere with school.

Fortunately, nearly all of the visual skills necessary for learning can be developed and improved. Learn more about improvements kids have made here and here.

There’s still time– schedule your child’s back-to-school eye exam today!

V&L_large

Scientific Basis for an Accommodation Already in Use in VT Practices

books

Image courtesy of adamr/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Amanda Zeller Manley, O.D., F.C.O.V.D.

It’s always nice when research proves the benefit of what we’ve already been doing in clinic.

For the last several years, as e-readers have become more prevalent, I have been recommending them to many of my patients. In our clinic, we have found that by increasing the font size (which also increases letter/word spacing and decreases the number of words per line), many of our vision therapy patients report that they can read more quickly, with better comprehension and less fatigue.

So I was quite pleased to hear an NPR story a few days ago about a study described in the journal PLOS ONE.  Researchers had dyslexic students read on specially formatted iPods or printed text. For many of the students, reading on the iPods (limited to about 3 words per line) greatly improved their reading speed and fluency.

The lead researcher, Matthew Schneps, director of the Laboratory for Visual Learning at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, postulates that the mechanisms involved include visual attention span; saccades (the small word-to-word eye movements we make when reading); and visual crowding. By limiting the amount of text per line, deficiencies in those areas don’t have the same effect as when a person reads a normally printed page.

What I find interesting is that in the article, there was no mention of whether these students had had a comprehensive vision examination to look for oculomotor dysfunction, convergence problems (excess or insufficiency), or other binocular vision disorders. In numerous other publications, there have been links between dyslexia and eye movement disorders and binocular vision problems. In many studies of learning disabilities and vision disorders, it has been found that up to 70% of students who have been diagnosed with a learning disability have a vision problem that may be causing or exacerbating that learning difficulty. It would be interesting to see whether the population described in Dr. Schneps’s study has a similar incidence of vision problems.

Fortunately, vision therapy has shown to be a very effective tool in eliminating the underlying visual problems that interfere with reading and learning. And in the meantime, an iPod fits neatly in your pocket.

Our Winter Mini-Symposium was a Success!

Last night, February 24, 2011, we hosted a mini-symposium at the new and improved Vision & Conceptual Development Center. We had fifteen people in attendance representing a variety of professional backgrounds.
Our first speaker was Joseph Manley, MD, discussing the American Academy of Pediatrics position statement on Learning Disabilities, Dyslexia and Vision. Dr. Manley’s premise is that the AAP is ignoring peer-reviewed research and evidence-based medicine in their assertion that vision therapy is not an appropriate treatment for children with learning disabilities and dyslexia. Dr. Manley presented numerous sources who found a higher incidence of vision problems in children with dyslexia and learning disabilities.

I was the second speaker, with a talk titled Vision, Behavior, and Academics, in which I explored the documented binocular vision problems in students with inappropriate classroom behavior, and how that impacts the learning of all students.

Finally, our keynote speaker was Jean Thomas, MD. Dr. Thomas is the President of Child & Family Integrated Therapies, LLC, which is a part of Integrated Therapeutic Services for Families and Children, Inc, in Kensington, MD. Formerly on staff at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC, Dr. Thomas is recognized nationally and internationally for her contributions to an interdisciplinary effort to develop age-specific mental health diagnostic criteria for children aged birth through three years old. In her talk last night on Early Disruptive Disorders, Dr. Thomas emphasized the importance of the family interactions and dynamics to develop the best outcome for the troubled child.

All in all, the evening was a success, and we look forward to many future educational events for professionals, parents, and patients. To sign up for our mailing list, please click here.