Vision Problems Masquerade as Learning Disabilities

It is important to understand that while our eyes take in visual information, that information is sent to the brain where it is processed. If the information that is sent to the brain is faulty, it can make learning very difficult.

While learning disability websites list a variety of accommodations that can help children with Visual Information Processing Disorders, it is important for parents and educators to understand that these are signs that a correctable vision problem is playing a role in a child’s learning challenges.

Many individuals with learning disabilities also have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). One of the signs that a vision problem may be contributing to one’s learning challenges is a short attention span when it comes to reading and near work. This behavior could easily be mistaken for ADHD.

A study published in the November 2013 issue of the Journal of Attention Disorders states that “attention and internalizing problems improved significantly following treatment for     Convergence Insufficiency.” Convergence insufficiency is an eye coordination disorder which can make reading difficult and cause symptoms such as eye strain, double vision, loss of concentration, and frequent loss of place when reading and working up close, all which play a negative role in learning.

The National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health recently funded a 5-year, 8 million dollar study called the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial – Attention and Reading Study (CITT-ART).  This will be a national multi-center clinical trial that involves optometry, ophthalmology, psychiatry, and education in evaluating how this eye-teaming problem impacts a child’s attention and reading performance.

These studies are very exciting because we are sure they will prove what we have seen in our patients over the years: Vision problems, including eye coordination and eye movement disorders, can and do impact the ability to read and pay attention. We are able to help children and adults.

For more information visit our website: http://www.VisionTherapyDC.com

More Reasons Your Child Needs an Eye Exam, Not a Vision Screening

The most recent Review of Optometry has three news items emphasizing the importance of infant and child eye and vision evaluation– not just a screening done by the pediatrician or school nurse.

The first describes how retinoblastoma, a rare but potentially fatal eye cancer found in children, can be detected by the appearance of a white pupil in baby photos. It used to be thought that early stage eye cancer couldn’t be detected this way, but a recent study found that early disease in a child as young as 12 days can be visible as a white pupil.

When treated early, retinoblastoma is often curable.

Next, a new study shows that in children with autism, changes in visual behavior can be

Using eye-tracking technology, researchers found that infants later diagnosed with autism showed a decline in attention to others’ eyes by two to six months of age.

detected in the first few months of life. The children that were later diagnosed with autism started out showing normal eye contact with caregivers, but over the next several months their eye contact decreased. Decrease in eye contact began somewhere between two and six months of age. Since the social interaction (eye contact) started out intact, it suggests that there may be another opportunity for early intervention in autism.

Finally, researchers in Sweden discovered that children born before 32 weeks gestational age had a much higher– up to 19 times– risk for retinal detachment by adolescence or young adulthood. The risk for retinal detachment increased with age. So for children born prematurely, it’s very important to have annual dilated eye examinations. It’s also critical to know the signs and symptoms of a retinal detachment: sudden onset or sudden increase of floating spots in the vision, which may look like hairs, cobwebs, or debris in the visual field; flashes of light in the affected eye; and what may look like a curtain or shadow over part of the visual field. If a person notices any of these symptoms, it’s critical to contact an eye care provider immediately. A retinal detachment is an emergency, and the sooner it can be repaired, the more likely the person’s sight can be saved.

If you have any concerns about your child’s developing vision, the first step is a comprehensive eye and vision evaluation. The American Optometric Association sponsors a public health initiative called InfantSEE, which provides no-cost examinations to children between 6 and 12 months of age. Infantsee.org can help you find a participating provider in your area. Yearly eye examinations are also now covered by all insurances as an essential benefit for children under 19 as a part of the Affordable Care Act.DSC_0294

At the Vision & Conceptual Development Center, we provide evaluation and non-invasive, non-surgical treatment for a variety of vision disorders, including Convergence Insufficiency, Strabismus (eye turn), Amblyopia (lazy eye), problems with tracking, Visual Perceptual disorders, and visual anomalies secondary to developmental delay, autism, concussion, stroke, or brain injury. We are also InfantSEE providers.