Halloween Eye Safety

October is Eye Injury Prevention Month, so let’s take a minute to consider a couple of common sense eye safely tips this Halloween.

Is this how you want your costume to turn out?

nasty eye

Horrible eye infection from wearing a non-prescribed decorative contact lens. Ouch!

Using flea-market, beauty shop, or internet purchased contact lenses without a proper fitting is setting yourself up for an ugly eye that lasts well past Halloween night. The FDA is cracking down on unlicensed vendors and educating the public about poorly-fitted lenses. Don’t go blind! Most optometrists can properly fit decorative lenses at a reasonable price.

This costume looks cool, but it would be easy to get hit by a car or fall down the steps when your vision is impaired by this mask. Wigs or scarves should be kept out of kids’ eyes, too.

Just like wearing a blindfold.

Choose makeup instead, especially for young children. Check that it’s approved for use around the eyes, or better yet, avoid the eye area.

More Reasons Your Child Needs an Eye Exam, Not a Vision Screening

The most recent Review of Optometry has three news items emphasizing the importance of infant and child eye and vision evaluation– not just a screening done by the pediatrician or school nurse.

The first describes how retinoblastoma, a rare but potentially fatal eye cancer found in children, can be detected by the appearance of a white pupil in baby photos. It used to be thought that early stage eye cancer couldn’t be detected this way, but a recent study found that early disease in a child as young as 12 days can be visible as a white pupil.

When treated early, retinoblastoma is often curable.

Next, a new study shows that in children with autism, changes in visual behavior can be

Using eye-tracking technology, researchers found that infants later diagnosed with autism showed a decline in attention to others’ eyes by two to six months of age.

detected in the first few months of life. The children that were later diagnosed with autism started out showing normal eye contact with caregivers, but over the next several months their eye contact decreased. Decrease in eye contact began somewhere between two and six months of age. Since the social interaction (eye contact) started out intact, it suggests that there may be another opportunity for early intervention in autism.

Finally, researchers in Sweden discovered that children born before 32 weeks gestational age had a much higher– up to 19 times– risk for retinal detachment by adolescence or young adulthood. The risk for retinal detachment increased with age. So for children born prematurely, it’s very important to have annual dilated eye examinations. It’s also critical to know the signs and symptoms of a retinal detachment: sudden onset or sudden increase of floating spots in the vision, which may look like hairs, cobwebs, or debris in the visual field; flashes of light in the affected eye; and what may look like a curtain or shadow over part of the visual field. If a person notices any of these symptoms, it’s critical to contact an eye care provider immediately. A retinal detachment is an emergency, and the sooner it can be repaired, the more likely the person’s sight can be saved.

If you have any concerns about your child’s developing vision, the first step is a comprehensive eye and vision evaluation. The American Optometric Association sponsors a public health initiative called InfantSEE, which provides no-cost examinations to children between 6 and 12 months of age. Infantsee.org can help you find a participating provider in your area. Yearly eye examinations are also now covered by all insurances as an essential benefit for children under 19 as a part of the Affordable Care Act.DSC_0294

At the Vision & Conceptual Development Center, we provide evaluation and non-invasive, non-surgical treatment for a variety of vision disorders, including Convergence Insufficiency, Strabismus (eye turn), Amblyopia (lazy eye), problems with tracking, Visual Perceptual disorders, and visual anomalies secondary to developmental delay, autism, concussion, stroke, or brain injury. We are also InfantSEE providers.

You’ll shoot your eye out!

Blue laser toys have burned holes in the retinas of 30 boys, recently reported Saudi Arabia’s King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine. These toys, available on the internet, may seem harmless but in fact can cause serious eye damage. So if your child received such a toy over the holidays, you may want it to become “lost”. Just tell Uncle Bob that UPS never delivered.

You'll shoot your eye out!

Lasers? No way!